CONTEST DIET2018-10-27T16:38:50+00:00

CONTEST DIET

Diet is the single most important and difficult aspect of your plan. Moreover, dietary needs will vary from person-to-person. There are some basic formulas and techniques that will give you a head start.

Caloric Formulas

The concept is simple; eat more than you burn and you will add weight. Eat less than you burn and you will lose weight. Note: These formulas will have variation based on an individual’s metabolism. For the following section, we will use the subject: 200 pounds man at 10% body fat.

GOAL: Calculate how many calories burned per day

As formulas are discussed we will reference a “SUBJECT” as an example to apply the formulas.

SUBJECT STATS

  • Male
  • 200 pounds
  • 10% bodyfat
  • Daily Activities Moderate
  • 60 Minutes Weight Training
  • 20 Minutes Fat Burning Zone Cardio
  • GOAL 3% body fat in 12 weeks

1. Calculate lean Body Mass

Lean Body Mass is the amount of you weigh, minus fat. This includes bones, muscle, organ tissue, blood, etc.

Body weight – (Body fat% x body weight) = Lean Mass

 SUBJECT: 200-(10% x 200) = 180 Pounds Lean Body Mass (LBM)

2. Calculate Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR)

There are many equations to calculate BMR. The very common Harris-Benedict equation uses height. The problem with that is it assumes a certain body fat percentage. The results are a 250 pound, 5’ 10” bodybuilder at 6% bodyfat would be considered obese and formula results for our subject would equal 36% body fat.

The formula commonly used for weight training athletes is:

LBM x 11 = BMR

Subject: 180 x 11 = 1,980

BMR = 1,980

3.  Calculate Calories from Daily Activities

BRM is the amount of calories you burn doing nothing. It means, resting in a dark room on an empty stomach with no stimuli. Therefore, we still need to add the calories you burn with daily activity and calories burned from training.

Start with the level of physical stress activity during your daily activities. This is going to be based on what your day entails. If you sit a desk the rate your physical stress activity at “Sedentary”. If you dig holes all day in the hot sun, rate your physical stress activity at “Very Active”. Use your judgment to calculate your activity.  Rate them as:

  • Sedentary – add 20%
  • Moderate – add 30%
  • Active – add 45%
  • Very Active – add 60%

Our subject rates his physical stress activity at Moderate. The following formula will apply.

(BMR x Physical Stress) = Physical Stress Calories

SUBJECT: (1,980 x 30%) = 594 Calories

Add Training

Calories burned when training can vary widely based on the output. Since you are training for a contest we are going to assume you are performing at your maximum ability.

We are going to use 3 types of activities:

  • Weight Training at .0477 calories per minute
  • Aerobic Zone (70-85% of max heart rate) – .0555 calories per minute
  • Fat Burning Zone (60-70% max heart rate) – . 0517 calories per minute

Our Subject does 60 minutes of weight training and 20 minutes of Fat Burning Cardio

Time x Calories per minute x Total Body Weight (lbs) = Training Calories Burned

SUBJECT:

60 minutes x .0477 x 200 = 572.4 Calories

20 minutes x .0517 x 200 = 206.8 Calories

Total Training Calories Burned = 779.2 Calories

Add it all Up!

BRM + Physical Stress Calories + Training Calories

1980 + 594 + 779.2 = 3,353.2

This means our subject requires a total of 3.353.2 calories to maintain his body weight.

Adjusting Calories for the Goal

Now, we that we know how many calories it takes for our subject to maintain his weight. We want to find out how many calories he needs to cut to achieve his contest body fat goal of 3%. As you may remember, he is 10% body fat. To determine the amount of body fat need to lose you simply subtract current body fat from “goal body fat”.

Current Body fat % – Goal body fat % = Body fat % need to lose

SUBJECT: 10% – 3% = 7%

How much does 7% body fat weigh?

Now we need to know how many pounds 7% body fat is on our subject. We can calculate this number by multiplying “body fat to lose” by current body weight.

As determined by the equation, our subject needs to lose 14 pounds of fat.

Body Fat to Lose x Body Weight = Weight to Lose

 SUBJECT: 7% x 200 = 14 pounds

1 pound of body weight (fat or muscle) is 3,500 calories.

This means if you want to gain a pound, you have to eat 3,500 calories more than you burn. If you want to lose a pound, you have to eat 3,500 fewer calories. Our subject will multiply the 14 pounds needed to lose by 3,500 calories

Our subject needs to burn 49,000 calories to achieve stage conditioning.

Pounds to lose x 3,500 calories = amount of calories needed to lose through out the prep

SUBJECT: 14 Pounds to lose x 3,500 calories = 49,000 Calories

Timing

The show is 12 weeks away. He has 84 days. He needs to figure out his caloric deficit per day to burn enough calories per day to achieve his goal. Divide the total number of calories needed to burn by number of days until the contest.

Calories need to burn / number of days = Daily Caloric Deficit

SUBJECT: 49,000 / 84 days = 583 Calories

Final Calories Need to Consume per Day

Our subject needs to burn 583 calories more than he burns per day. If he does, he will lose exactly the weight required to achieve his goal for show time. Now you can determine the exact amount of calories he needs to consume to achieve his goal by taking his calories burned per day and subtracting the calories he needs to burn to achieve his goal. 

Our subject needs to eat 2,770.02 calories per day!

Calories burned per day – Daily Caloric Deficit = Calories Consumed Per Day

 SUBJECT:  3,353.2 – 583 = 2,770.02

MACROS

Protein, Carbohydrate & Fat Distribution

You’ve heard of people “Counting their Macros”. This is when they are given a fixed amount of protein, carbohydrates, and fats in a day. This system is too simple and is not the best method for contest prep. Macro nutrients need to be properly distributed throughout the day. You’ll also find it needs to be timed with certain activities such as adding a bit more fat before a training and more carbs after. Additionally, you’ll want to avoid combining fats and carbs.

Insulin can be spiked by carbohydrates. Insulin is a fat storing hormone as it increases the major fat storing enzyme in the body called lipoprotein lipase (LPL). It also does two other nasty things that make fat loss very difficult when it is around in larger amounts: decrease hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) the major fat burning enzyme AND slow fat oxidation by suppression of CPT-1 (the rate limiting step in fat burning).

With this understanding of carbohydrates and their relationship to fat consumption and storage, you can see how only “counting your macros” could be disastrous. Also keep in mind that not all carbs are equal. 50 carbs from white bread compared to 50 grams of steel cut oats have a completely different effect on insulin.

Macro Ratios

There are MANY different opinions on what is the perfect macro ratio. The main reason it varies is that every individual responds differently.  In the world of contest prep, there are 2 main approaches:

  • High Protein, No Carbs and High Fat (Ketogenic Diet)

The “keto” in a ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”. This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar).

Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then used as fuel throughout the body, including the brain. The brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones.

On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low and fat burning increases dramatically.

The Problem

It takes 2-7 days to get into ketosis. You need to monitor it by urinating on Ketone Test Strips for Urinalysis to measure your ketones and determine if you have achieved ketosis. Getting to ketosis is easy, becoming keto-adapted is the tricky part. It usually takes a month to get to the first stage of becoming keto-adapted, and it takes up to 2 years to fully train your body to use ketones fully.

Eat one cookie, fruit or any carb and you start all over on Day 1. There is no room for error.

High Protein, Medium Carbs and Low Fat

This is the more balanced option. It requires planning throughout your day to time your fats and carbs. As you’ve learned fats and carbs should rarely be mixed. Use fats before training. Use carbs between training for recovery. This will also help you feel focused providing the glucose you need for energy and brain function. Plus, you can have a cheat meal once a week in the early part of your prep after a solid leg day!

The ratio is approximately:

  • 50% Protein
  • 35% Carbohydrates
  • 15% Fats

As your prep progresses, you will make adjustments lowering both fats and carbs. These small adjustments keep you progressing. In the 2 weeks before your contest your diet may look more like this:

  • 70% Protein
  • 25% Carbohydrates
  • 5% Fats

SAMPLE CONTEST PREP MEAL PLANS

For Men & Women

These meal plans are the formulas in action. Details of these plans have been developed by over 10 years of research with Nutritionists, IFBB Pros, top industry trainers, and physicians. Customized versions of this very plan have created countless overall champions, IFBB Pros and even Olympia athletes.

If you would like a plan customized for your contest prep, please contact IFBB Pro Bojana Vasiljevic to discuss details at bojana.fitness@gmail.com.

SUBJECT STATS

  • Male
  • 200 pounds
  • 10% bodyfat
  • Daily Activities Moderate
  • 60 Minutes Weight Training
  • 20 Minutes Fat Burning Zone Cardio
  • GOAL 3% body fat in 12 weeks

SUBJECT STATS

  • Feale
  • 130 pounds
  • 10% bodyfat
  • Daily Activities Moderate
  • 60 Minutes Weight Training
  • 30 Minutes Fat Burning Zone Cardio
  • GOAL 10% body fat in 12 weeks

Chapter 2 – Training
Chapter 4 – Lifestyle

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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.